PPC

5 Things I’ve learned in my First Month as a PPC Account Manager

 

  1. If I had to choose the one thing that I like the most about this job, it would have to be that there are so many ways to do everything; the versatility and resources that we as PPC account managers have at our disposal is immense. Along with the fact that this industry is still in its infancy, there are best practices but no defined methodology which means our techniques and approaches are limited predominantly by our creativity.

  2.  Putting everything I’ve learned into practice has not been an easy task. I did a course in SEO and PPC in Canada (highly recommended) and so I had previous experience in using AdWords – or so I thought. AdWords Editor is your best friend; although it can’t do everything for you it makes your life so much simpler. If anyone reading this isn’t already an account manager, but would like to be one, I suggest you get familiar with AdWords Editor, Google’s AdWords interface and Google Analytics. Proficiency in Excel will be that extra cherry on top. I’m sure there are other useful tools depending on the scale that you work at.

  3. I feel that in many ways the ability to manage clients in a well refined manner is crucial. There needs to be an equal level of competency between the technical capabilities of an account manager and their ability to communicate with and manage their clients. It doesn’t matter how well their accounts are managed if the relationship with the clients are weak, though of course the inverse is true as well.

  4. In the same vein, PPC jargon usage is a two sided coin because when it comes to clients, bombarding them with technical, industry related terms can often lead to confusion and a very “salesy” feel. When it comes to colleagues, use as many terms as needed to paint the most specific picture, especially when asking questions.

  5. Ask questions! This doesn’t mean that you should ask about everything because, despite what my elementary school teacher said, there are stupid questions. Some things are easily found out with the help of a little Google-fu (also a necessary skill). However, I found that watching and asking makes learning much quicker and also in many cases I learn of more logical ways to do things. My lack of experience means that I often cannot plan for scalability issues, and by asking I reduce the need to fix things later on. Also, as mentioned earlier, the industry is still growing and as exciting as this is, the variety of ways to accomplish each tasks can be daunting. So sorry Mr. Sinatra, ain’t gonna do it my way.
  Written by Jeff Chang